As the son of Lyonel Feininger, T. Lux Feininger practically grew up at the Bauhaus. With his camera, he tirelessly documented the vibrant life at the Bauhaus. His photographs, sparkling with the joy of life, helped him get work as a popular photojournalist for the prestigious photo agency Dephot.

T. Lux Feininger in his own studio in Dessau, photo: Lore (Eleonore) Feininger, Winter 1930–1931. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin / © unknown.
T. Lux Feininger in his own studio in Dessau, photo: Lore (Eleonore) Feininger, Winter 1930–1931. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin / © unknown.

As the son of the Bauhaus masters Lyonel Feiniger, Theodore Lux Feininger experienced the Weimar and the Dessau Bauhaus. He began his studies at the Bauhaus Dessau in 1926 with the preliminary course of Josef Albers. After the preliminary course, he attended classes with László Moholy-Nagy, Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky. He worked in Oskar Schlemmer’s theatre workshop until the winter semester of 1929. In addition, he was an active member of the Bauhaus-Kapelle band. Just like his brother Andreas, T. Lux Feininger increasingly dedicated himself to photography towards the end of his studies. Between 1927 and 1931, he worked as a photo reporter for the Berlin DEPHOT agency, as well as for various periodicals and illustrated magazines.

Jump over the Bauhaus, photo: T. Lux Feininger, around 1927. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin / © T. Lux Feininger Estate.
Jump over the Bauhaus, photo: T. Lux Feininger, around 1927. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin / © T. Lux Feininger Estate.

Starting in 1930, he primarily turned to painting. After a number of years in Paris and Berlin, he immigrated to the United States in 1936 and created a respectable body of artistic work there as a freelance painter. After the end of the Second World War, he received various university teaching positions for painting such as those at Sarah Lawrence College and the Fogg Museum of the Harvard University in Cambridge/Mass. Starting in 1962, he also worked as a teacher in the painting department of the Boston Museum School.

With the photography that he created beginning in the mid-1920s, he had a lasting effect on the image of life at the Bauhaus. Above all, his photo of Sports at the Bauhaus – the picture of the Bauhäuslers playing football in front of the Dessau building – still has a virtually iconic character.

Members of the Bauhaus band (with Oskar Schlemmer, Werner Jackson, Xanti Schawinsky, Hermann Clemens Röseler), photo: T. Lux Feininger, around 1928. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin / © T. Lux Feininger Estate.
Members of the Bauhaus band (with Oskar Schlemmer, Werner Jackson, Xanti Schawinsky, Hermann Clemens Röseler), photo: T. Lux Feininger, around 1928. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin / © T. Lux Feininger Estate.

Literature:
Büche, Wolfgang (1998): T. Lux Feininger, Halle (Saale).
Feininger, T. Lux: Die Bauhauskapelle. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Bauhauses, typoscript, Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin.
Feininger, T. Lux (2006): Zwei Weltem. Mein Künstlerleben zwischen Bauhaus und Amerika, Halle.
Feininger, T. Lux (1980): Photographs of the Twenties and Thirties, New York.
Fiedler, Janine (1990): T. Lux Feininger. Ich bin Maler und nicht Fotograf!, in: Fiedler, Jeannine (Hg.): Fotografie am Bauhaus, Berlin, p. 44–53.
Luckhardt, Ulrich (2010): Welten-Segler. T. Lux Feininger zum 100. Geburtstag, Kiel.
Städtische Galerie Karlsruhe (2001): Feininger. Eine Künstlerfamilie, Ostfildern-Ruit.