Expansion of the Dessau-Törten Settlement, Laubenganghaus, design: Hannes Meyer and the Bauhaus Dessau Architectural Department, 1929–30. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin / © Bauhaus Dessau Foundation (for Meyer).
Expansion of the Dessau-Törten Settlement, Laubenganghaus, design: Hannes Meyer and the Bauhaus Dessau Architectural Department, 1929–30. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin / © Bauhaus Dessau Foundation (for Meyer).

With the construction of the second phase of the Törten Estate, the Bauhaus’s department of architecture entered into its first collaborative building project. Three study cells formed by the students took on the design and development planning of the estate – a mixed development of single-family and rental properties – under the direction of Hannes Meyer and other teachers in the architecture department such as Hans Wittwer and Ludwig Hilberseimer. However, Meyer (in collaboration with 12 students) was to build only five Balcony Access Houses before his dismissal. Each of the three-storey buildings houses 18 flats, each with 2.5 rooms on 47 square metres with self-contained central heating, fitted kitchen and bathroom. Access to the flats is facilitated by staircase towers and balconies running along the north façade. The balconies that were planned for the south façade were not built for cost reasons.

Literature:
Winkler, Klaus-Jürgen (1989): Der Architekt Hannes Meyer. Anschauungen und Werk, hg. v. Sektion Architektur, Hochschule für Architektur und Bauwesen Weimar, Berlin.
Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main (1989): Hannes Meyer 1889–1954. Architekt, Urbanist, Lehrer, Berlin. 

Expansion of the Dessau-Törten Settlement, Laubenganghaus, design: Hannes Meyer and the Bauhaus Dessau Architectural Department, 1929–30. © Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin.
Expansion of the Dessau-Törten Settlement, Laubenganghaus, design: Hannes Meyer and the Bauhaus Dessau Architectural Department, 1929–30. © Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin.