A symposium on 2 and 3 November 2017 provides insight into the research project “The Bauhaus in Oldenburg – Avant-garde in the Provinces”. The research focuses on the collaboration between the Oldenburg State Museum and the Bauhaus during the Weimar Republic, as well as the work of four Bauhauslers from Oldenburg and Eastern Friesland.

A residental ensemble designed by Hermann Gautel, about 1935 / Photo: Oldenburg State Museum for Art and Cultural History
A residental ensemble designed by Hermann Gautel, about 1935 / Photo: Oldenburg State Museum for Art and Cultural History

“We are piecing together a complex mosaic and, little by little, a recognisable picture is emerging from that”, says Gloria Köpnick, when asked about the work on the Bauhaus research project. Together with the museum’s director Rainer Stamm, the art historian and research associate has been researching the links between the Oldenburg State Museum and the Bauhaus since 2016.

“The Bauhaus”, explains Rainer Stamm, “was the most influential schools of design in the twentieth century and a testing ground for new ideas that remain influential today. In the mid-1920s the Oldenburg State Museum was one of the first museums to vouch for the approach adopted by this innovative educational institution.” A predecessor of Stamm’s was one of the first museum directors in Germany to support the Bauhaus ideas through acquisitions of furniture and products: Walter Müller-Wulckow was appointed director of the Oldenburg State Museum in 1921. The museum was “like an ambassador for the Bauhaus ideas in North-west Germany”, says Stamm.

Based on the exemplary careers of the Bauhauslers Hermann Gautel, Hans Martin Fricke, Karl Schwoon and Hin Bredendieck, all born in the Oldenburg region, the history of the liberal and innovative Bauhaus idea, for example, is examined. “The Bauhauslers have left their mark in the archives of the Oldenburg State Museum as well as in municipal, regional, national and international archive collections. Correspondence, photographs and much more besides help us to reconstruct their lives and work step-by-step”, explains Köpnick.

Four Bauhausler (above: the Oldenburger Hermann Gautel; below: the Auricher Hin Bredendieck), about 1929 / Photo: Erich Krause (?); Oldenburg State Museum for Art and Cultural History
Four Bauhausler (above: the Oldenburger Hermann Gautel; below: the Auricher Hin Bredendieck), about 1929 / Photo: Erich Krause (?); Oldenburg State Museum for Art and Cultural History

The symposium will now take place as part of the research project and the initial findings will be collated and discussed here. Based on the modules of the programme, “The influence and impact of the Bauhaus in and on the region”, “Fractured biographies”, “The Bauhaus in exile” and “Reeducation – reconstruction – economic miracle: The continued effect of the Bauhaus idea after 1945”, diverse themes will be addressed, such as “The association for new art and the Bauhaus Dessau” and “Hin Bredendieck: From Aurich to Atlanta”. Just in time for the major exhibition in 2019, Bredendieck’s Atlanta works will also be on show in Oldenburg, promises Stamm.

 

The Symposium will take place on 2 and 3 November 2017 in the Schlosssaal, Schlossplatz 1, 26135 Oldenburg. The project is a core part of the state of Lower Saxony’s contribution to the centenary of the Bauhaus in 2019.

 

Source: The statements are adopted from an Interview with Gloria Köpnick and Rainer Stamm, found on the homepage of tOldenburg State Museum for Art and Cultural History.

 

 

[CG 2017]