The Bauhaus year 2019 will be inaugurated in Berlin with a large festival. Many Bauhauslers and architects of modernism such as the brothers Taut, Mies, Gropius or Le Corbusier worked in the metropolis.

Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin, architecture: Walter Gropius, Alex Cvijanovic and Hans Bandel / photo: Markus Hawlik. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin.
Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin, architecture: Walter Gropius, Alex Cvijanovic and Hans Bandel / photo: Markus Hawlik. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin.

From 1932 until its closure due to National Socialist pressure in 1933, Berlin was the third and final station of the Bauhaus. Forced into exile by National Socialism, two Bauhaus directors built again in the metropolis on the river Spree after the Second World War: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe built the Neue Nationalgalerie that is under refurbishment until 2019 and Walter Gropius the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung: two internationally renowned museums that are listed buildings today.

The Bauhaus-Archiv/Museum für Gestaltung in Berlin houses the world’s largest Bauhaus collection. A new museum building is currently being added by the Berlin architects Staab until 2021. The Bauhaus-Archiv is already making a reference to the grand Centenary with a kick-off exhibition in 2017.

In 2019 the capital will be one of the central venues of the Centenary along with Dessau and Weimar. Here the Centenary will begin with an opening festival and the Centenary Show of the Bauhaus-Archiv as well as the international exhibition project “Bauhaus Imaginista” that is on show at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt. Last but not least, further cultural institutions, associations and initiatives will take part in the centenary activities.

Moreover, with the UNESCO-World Heritage Siemensstadt Housing Estates by Walter Gropius and the Hufeisensiedlung by Bruno Taut as well as the Hansaviertel, Berlin offers impressive examples of residential building and urban planning of various phases of modernism.

 

Aerial view Hufeisensiedlung, architecture: Bruno Taut, 1925-1933. photo: Sebastian Trommer / Wikimedia.
Aerial view Hufeisensiedlung, architecture: Bruno Taut, 1925-1933. photo: Sebastian Trommer / Wikimedia.

Visiting modernism

Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung 
Architect: Walter Gropius, Alex Cvijanovic and Hans Bandel (1976–79)
Klingelhöferstraße 14, 10785 Berlin
(closed since 2018 due to renovation work)

Siemensstadt Housing Estate
UNESCO World Heritage, architects: Hans Scharoun, Walter Gropius, Hugo Häring et al. (1929–34)
Jungfernheideweg, 13629 Berlin

Hufeisensiedlung (Horseshoe Estate) 
UNESCO World Heritage, architect: Bruno Taut (1925–30)
Info Station Hufeisensiedlung, Fritz-Reuter-Allee 44, 12359 Berlin

Hansaviertel 
53 architects: a. o. Alvar Aalto, Egon Eiermann, Walter Gropius, Arne Jacobsen, Oscar Niemeyer and Max Taut (1955–62)
Altonaer Straße 22, 10557 Berlin

Neue Nationalgalerie 
Architect: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1965/68)
Closed until 2019
Potsdamer Straße 50, 10785 Berlin

AEG Turbine Hall 
Architect: Peter Behrens (1908/09)
Huttenstraße 12–19, 10553 Berlin

Haus Lemke 
Architect: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1932/33)
Oberseestraße 60, 13053 Berlin

 

Haus Lemke, architecture: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1932/1933. photo: Manfred Brüeckels / Wikimedia.
Haus Lemke, architecture: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1932/1933. photo: Manfred Brüeckels / Wikimedia.

Experiencing modernism

Berlin is preparing a variety of contributions for the Bauhaus Centenary, for example: 

Opening Festival „100 years of bauhaus“
with performative formats from contemporary art, theatre and music
January 16, 2019 – January 24, 2019

”bauhaus imaginista: Still Undead“
Finale of the international exhibition project
March 15, 2019 – June 10, 2019

„bauhaus: produktion – reproduktion“
Centenary exhibition of the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung
September 6, 2019 – January 27, 2019
Berlinische Galerie, Berlin

More on the activities and Berlin’s connections to the Bauhaus can be found here.