Numerous discoveries can be made in Saxony on the building culture of the Bauhaus and modernism. These range from Josef Albers in the GRASSI Museum in Leipzig, to Oskar Schlemmer’s Haus Rabe in Zwenkau or Scharoun’s Haus Schminke in Löbau.

Sculpture in Rabe House, Zwenkau, artist: Oskar Schlemmer, 1930 / photo: Dieter Leistner.
Sculpture in Rabe House, Zwenkau, artist: Oskar Schlemmer, 1930 / photo: Dieter Leistner.

In the Grassi Museum of Applied Art in Leipzig, Josef Albers designed the largest glass surface created during the Bauhaus period. The Leipziger “Rundling” (rotunda) – a circularly arranged housing estate with 300 flats – shows pioneering communal residential building in the 1930s. The Leipziger Versöhnungskirche (Leipzig Church of Reconciliation) is also well worth a visit and is one of the most import historical monuments of classic modernism.

In Dresden, the state capital, a modern factory was built as early as 1908 in the form of the Deutsche Werkstätten Hellerau. Starting in 1909, Germany’s first garden city, Dresden-Hellerau, closely connected to the Deutscher Werkbund – was built in immediate proximity. The Hellerau Festival Theatre was built as educational centre for rhythm in 1911. Today it houses the HELLERAU – European Centre for the Arts Dresden, offering numerous theatre, dance and music performances.

The Haus Schminke in Löbau beckons visitors. It was designed by Hans Scharoun in 1930 in the New Architecture style for the noodle manufacturer Fritz Schminke, who wanted a modern and extravagant home. And Oskar Schlemmer added his unmistakable signature to the Haus Rabe (Rabe House) in Zwenkau with elaborate interior decoration.

Haus Schminke, architecture: Hans Scharoun, 1932–33 / photo: Ralf Ganter. Stiftung Haus Schminke.
Haus Schminke, architecture: Hans Scharoun, 1932–33 / photo: Ralf Ganter. Stiftung Haus Schminke.

Visiting modernism

GRASSI Museum of Applied Art
Architects: Zweck & Voigt, Hubert Ritter (1925–29), Fenstergestaltung von Josef Albers
Johannisplatz 5, 04103 Leipzig

Versöhnungskirche in Leipzig (Leipzig Church of Reconciliation)
Architect: Hans Heinrich Grotjahn (1930–32)
Viertelsweg/Ecke Franz-Mehring-Straße 44, 04157 Leipzig

Gartenstadt Hellerau (Garden City of Hellerau)
Architects: Richard Riemerschmid, Heinrich Tessenow, Hermann Muthesius (1909 ff.)
01109 Dresden

Hellerau – European Centre for the Arts Dresden
Architect: Heinrich Tessenow (1911)
Karl-Liebknecht-Straße 5, 01109 Dresden

Haus Schminke
Architect: Hans Scharoun (1930)
Kirschallee 1b, 02708 Löbau

Haus Rabe
Interior decoration: Oskar Schlemmer (1930)
Friedrich-Ebert-Straße 26, 04442 Zwenkau

 

Historic company building of the Deutsche Werkstätten, architecture: Richard Riemerschmid, 1909–10 / photo: Lothar Sprenger.
Historic company building of the Deutsche Werkstätten, architecture: Richard Riemerschmid, 1909–10 / photo: Lothar Sprenger.

Experiencing modernism

The Federal State of Saxony is preparing a variety of contributions for the Bauhaus Centenary 2019, for example:

Summer of Modernism
Series of exhibitions and events
at different sites and venues in Saxony

More on the activities and the Federal State’s connections to the Bauhaus can be found here.